Ekar is a Hebrew word that means: the most important things.

For nearly a decade, Ekar has served as a focal point for Denver’s Jewish community to come together around issues of food security, environmentalism and urban farming. Ekar has been integral in providing new ways for Jews to connect to their heritage while simultaneously assisting in the cause to end hunger. Since the organization’s founding, thousands of individuals – young and old, Jewish and non-Jewish – have been engaged and inspired by Ekar’s mission. And tens of thousands of pounds of produce have gone to food banks to lessen the impact of hunger.

Ekar Farm is a meeting place, common ground for people to come together outdoors to connect, to grow, to nourish, and to repair both the land and our human ties to one another. We create community with skills-based trainings and food justice education, garden-based programming, celebrating Shabbat and holiday gatherings, and acting in solidarity with all who uproot systems of oppression that unjustly influence our agricultural, environmental, and social wellbeing.

Ekar was founded as a labor of love. We are grateful to the visionaries who built Ekar.  Amy Berkowitz Caplan attended a Hazon Food Conference and came back inspired to start a farm at her place of work - the Denver Academy of Torah (DAT) - and this partnership continues to grow and deepen today.  The Rose Community Foundation supported the farm,  and has made it possible for Ekar to flourish. Ilan Salzberg began the work of directing the farm. Aaron Ney succeeded him and led Ekar for nine years. Jason Plotkin farmed the land. Becca Weaver, now at Milk and Honey Farms, and Margot Sands educated visitors to the farm. We continue to build on their work, and their love of community, today.

Connect. Grow. Nourish. Repair.  

These are EKAR: the most important things.